Dirty Fashion: top brands source viscose from factories damaging the environment

Dirty fashion: a new report from the Changing Markets Foundation reveals top brands including H&M and Zara are buying viscose from factories wreaking havoc on the environment.

Some of the world’s largest fashion brands, including Sweden's H&M and Spain's Inditex/Zara, are buying viscose from highly polluting factories, reveals the report. Read more »

Brazil ranked world's most deadly nation for land activists as impunity reigns

A farmer evicted from this home in a land conflict with a powerful rancher poses for a photograph outside of Boca do Acre in Amazonas State, Brazil on May 26, 2017 (© Chris Arsenault, Thomson Reuters Foundation)

Standing beside broken floor boards and corrugated iron that once made-up his two-room house in the Amazon rainforest, Brazilian farmer Manoel Freitas da Conceicao is on the frontline of the world's most violent country for land activists.

Data released on 13th July 2017 by London-based campaign group Global Witness showed that 49 of 200 land rights activists killed last year were from South America's largest country, making Brazil the world's most dangerous nation for campaigners. Read more »

Aquaculture is main driver of mangrove losses

Mangroves provide coastal protection and habitat for several species. Shahnoor Habib Munmun | Wikimedia Commons

By Dyna Rochmyaningsih

Expanding aquaculture in South-East Asia over the last two decades has been the main driver of mangrove loss in the world, says a study published in PLOS One this month (June 2017).
Read more »

After Svalbard: why the safety of world seed vaults is crucial to future food security

Svalbard Seed Bank, Norway. © The Crop Trust

By Stuart Thompson, University of Westminster Read more »

Bee groups embrace new EU partnership with trust the key

Beekeepers, scientists, policy-makers and other relevant parties are to set up a European bee partnership that could transform the way bee health is assessed in the EU.

The pledge was the main outcome of a major scientific meeting held in Brussels on Monday 26th June 2017 entitled “Towards a European Bee Partnership” that was attended by more than 120 delegates from scientific organisations, EU bodies, researchers, beekeeper and farmers’ groups, and NGOs.

Willingness to collaborate Read more »

Will Amazon's Whole Foods deal go the same way as L'Oréal and Body Shop?

EQRoy/Shutterstock

By Tanusree Jain, Trinity College Dublin

Online retail giant Amazon has made a decisive move into food retail. The acquisition of US grocer Whole Foods, a pioneer in organic, healthy food shopping for well-off consumers, brings together two businesses with contrasting reputations. We’ve been here before. And it didn’t work out well. Read more »

To fight desertification we need to drive diversity on farms and plates

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Samuel Nduvi in Kikumini, Kenya has been growing drought tolerant sorghum intercropped with protein-rich legumes like pigeonpea and cowpea over the last three years. Credit: Alina Paul-Bossuet

 

By Alina Paul-Bossuet | ICRISAT

Farmland in Kenya’s north has deteriorated because of loss of soil nutrients and agro-biodiversity, putting livelihoods of 12 million people at risk Read more »

Radical Kitchen at the Serpentine Pavilion: a summer of community picnic talks

Serpentine Pavilion 2017, designed by Francis Kéré. Serpentine Gallery, London (23 June – 8 October 2017) © Kéré Architecture, Photography © 2017 Iwan Baan

Inspired by Francis Kéré’s stories of gathering, debate and community around a tree in his village of Gando, Burkina Faso, the Serpentine Pavilion 2017 will become host to a series of community picnic talks this summer, Radical Kitchen: Recipes for Building Community and Creating Change. Read more »

Why the world needs to get smarter about water consumption

Drop by drop. Shutterstock

Guest blog by Dragan Savic, University of Exeter

In 1900, just 15% of the world’s population lived in cities. Now that proportion is over 50%, which is a lot of people. In fact, it means around 4 billion human beings rely on urban infrastructure to keep them warm, mobile and clean. Read more »

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