Fuels

Toyota's Mirai: the future of fuel cell vehicles

Toyota will launch its all-new Mirai hydrogen fuel cell vehicle in Japan on 15 December, before introducing it in the UK and other selected European markets in 2015. Mirai – the name means future in Japanese – signals the start of a new age of vehicles. It uses hydrogen, an important future energy source, to generate electric power, delivering better environmental performance while giving customers the convenience and driving pleasure they expect from any car. Read more »

Honda drivers win 2014 MPG Marathon title in photo-finish as electric vehicles compete equally using less energy and no pollution

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Jerry Clist, maintenance controller at ALD Automotive(left) and co-driver Peter Thompson

The electric vehicles taking part in this year’s MPG Marathon demonstrated how cost effective and reliable they were by completing the course in virtually the same time as their competitors – but by using less energy and with no pollution.

Three electric vehicles took part for the first time in the 23-team eco-driving event, which was again sponsored by ALD Automotive and TRACKER and was won by Honda engineers Fergal McGrath and James Warren, driving a Honda Civic Tourer and recording an outstanding 97.92mpg. Read more »

What Car? tests show that a "greener" fuel to be launched in the UK this year will be less efficient & could cost motorists billions

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The launch of new, "greener" vehicle fuel onto the nation's forecourts later this year has been called "irresponsible" by the auto magazine What Car? After real-world testing, What Car? suggests that the E10 petrol could cost UK drivers billions of pounds a year and increase harmful CO2 tailpipe emissions.

The introduction of the new fuel, which contains 10% bio-ethanol, is on the back of European Union (EU) regulations designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The EU’s Renewable Energy Directive requires 10% of road transport energy to be from renewable sources by 2020. Read more »

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